NEW RESEARCH GRANTS AWARDED TO DRIVE DOWN STILLBIRTH RATES IN MIGRANT COMMUNITIES AND IMPROVE BEREAVEMENT CARE

Leading voice for stillbirth action, Stillbirth Foundation Australia, together with the National Centre for Research Excellence in Stillbirth (Stillbirth CRE), today announced major new funding for stillbirth research.

Two innovative research grants will focus on driving down currently increased chances of stillbirth in migrant communities and creating new guidelines for perinatal bereavement care.

Together, the grants represent the Foundation and Stillbirth CRE’s commitment to improving research collaboration to deliver tangible impacts on the tragic stillbirth toll, which far exceeds the road toll.

The major grant of $120,000 will be awarded jointly to the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Adelaide to reduce stillbirth in migrant populations.

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Research has shown that Australian women born in South Asia are more likely to have a stillbirth than other women.

The other grant of $40,000 will be awarded to Mater Research Institute at the University of Queensland to develop a parent-version of the national clinical guidelines on care around the time of stillbirth and neonatal death to assist parents and their health care providers in ensuring optimal individualised care.

Stillbirth Foundation Australia CEO, Kate Lynch, said the funding will work to save more lives and better support families touched by stillbirth.

“With six children stillborn every day in Australia, further research to improve quality of care for pregnant women and to more effectively support families is urgently needed,” Ms Lynch said.

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“We know that migrant communities, particularly from South Asian countries, are at greater risk of stillbirth – this research will directly look into why, and how we can save more lives.

“This research is only possible because of the extraordinary efforts of the Foundation’s supporters, who give up their time to raise funds to invest into research priorities.

“These are often people who have been touched by stillbirth themselves, and are devoting time, effort and money to stop it from happening to others.”

Director of the Stillbirth CRE, Professor Vicki Flenady said the grants represent a collaborative approach to addressing stillbirth research priorities.

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“This funding is vitally important in addressing stillbirth research priorities in Australia and highlights the leading partnership between the Stillbirth CRE and Stillbirth Foundation,” Professor Flenady said.

“By working collaboratively with research organisations across the country we can bring the best people together to ensure more healthy births and better support for families.”