Former Olympian joins 2020 intake of junior doctors

One of Australia’s greatest athletes, Jana Pittman, is one of 47 interns to join Blacktown and Mount Druitt hospitals today as part of the 2020 intake.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard visited Blacktown Hospital to welcome the recruits, who are part of a record 1027 interns that will start work in NSW public hospitals this year.

“I want to congratulate Dr Pittman and her colleagues and wish them every success as they start their medical careers at this state of the art facility,” Mr Hazzard said.

“Blacktown and Mount Druitt hospitals have had a $700 million expansion and as a result, these JMOs will benefit from world class mentors in world class surroundings.

MUST READ  NCOSS WELCOMES NSW GOVERNMENT INVESTMENT IN STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT

“Dr Pittman had many wins as an athlete but swapping her running spikes for a stethoscope is a win for patients, and I thank her and the entire JMO class of 2020.”

The NSW Government is investing $107 million in the internship program this year.

Since 2011, intern positions in NSW have increased by 257 or 33 per cent. Interns rotate through metropolitan, regional or rural hospitals, as well as General Practices.

NSW guarantees intern positions to all domestic medical graduates of NSW universities, and provides internships to many graduates from interstate universities.

Blacktown and Mount Druitt hospitals’ medical services director Brett Gardiner said Western Sydney Local Health District hospitals will welcome 130 interns this year.

MUST READ  The HonDavid Coleman MPlaunches The Salvation Army Red Shield Appeal to multicultural communities

“Our interns will have the opportunity to undertake roles in emergency, surgery and general medicine in a new hospital where the well-being of new recruits is a priority.”

Jana Pittman is a dual Olympian, two-time world champion and four-time Commonwealth Games gold medalist. She has spent the past seven years juggling three children, work and study and is ready to hit the hospital ground running.

“I loved my athletics career, representing Australia was gold, but I hope my future in medicine will be even better,” Ms Pittman said.

“It’s one of those things where you think you’re never going to get there, but it shows that if you persist with something you love, then it just might happen.”